Corvallis Municipal Airport

A new 100kW ground-mounted solar array at the Corvallis Airport was recently turned on. The location of the array is the former United Chrome EPA industrial Superfund site. The array will generate enough electricity to power at least 75% of the energy consumed by City-paid Pacific Power meters at the airport. This project demonstrates a very difficult to use property can be put to beneficial use. Click here to see real time electricity generation.

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Public Works

The City recently turned the switch on a new 208kw solar array at Public Works. The array will produce around 227,000 kwh per year, powering many of the meters on site, including the Fire Departments new Fire Training Facility. The array was built with funds from Pacific Power BlueSky customers and the Energy Trust of Oregon. See how much power it’s making by clicking here.

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Fire Station 4

The City turned on its first city-owned renewable solar electric generation project on May 24, 2011. The 15kW system was constructed on the roof of Fire Station #4 (Tunison) with 100% of the project funding coming from Pacific Power's Blue Sky program and the Energy Trust of Oregon. The new solar panels are expected to provide more than half of the station's demand. The 15 kW array has already produced 38,500 kWh of electricity, reducing purchased electricity at the station by 60%.

The system includes web-based monitoring that can be accessed here. It shows real-time (within a couple hours) and historical energy production from the panels.

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Fire Station 1

The City turned on its second city-owned renewable solar electric generation project on May 16, 2013. The project crossed department lines with expertise and effort coming from Fire, Public Works (Administration, Buildings, and Electronics), and Management Information Services. The 37kW system was constructed on the roof of Fire Station #1 (Harrison). The array is made up of 150 panels and is expected to produce 39,529 kWh, over 20% of the station’s electrical consumption. 100% of the project funding came from Pacific Power's Blue Sky program and the Energy Trust of Oregon.

The system uses micro-inverters to change the electricity produced in direct current (DC) to alternating current (AC). Unlike other installations that use one or two large inverters for an entire system, individual micro-inverters are joined to each solar panel. By having an inverter on each panel, it allows the system owner to monitor each panel for performance and reduces production losses in the event of an inverter failure, something that is not possible with large inverter installations where multiple panels feed into one inverter.

The micro-inverters send information to an online monitoring site that displays historical energy production from the panels. Individual panels can be observed by the site administrators for performance. Click here to access the siteClick here for a more detailed look at the system's energy production.

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Last updated: 7/14/2017 3:28:12 PM